MOUNTAIN LEADER

RESOURCES

BITS AND BOBS YOU MIGHT FIND USEFUL

This is a page full of helpful information to support you to gain your Mountain Leader Award. Do pop back regularly as we add new information and interesting links we find. 

NAVIGATION - THE FIVE D'S

DANGER

After interpreting the map correctly and identifying and hazards, you can then choose an appropriate strategy

DIRECTION

Set your map and / or take a compass bearing (guess the angle first) - these two should point you in the same direction

description

Interpret the map to identify what you will pass and tick off on route

distance

Measure the distance between the two points 

DURATION

Use time or pacings

Try to avoid navigation without building in a back up;

for example guess the bearing between two points prior to using compass

Use of the 5 D's is very relevant in bad visibility, but obviously in good vis, you may not need to use them all,

pick and choose appropriate techniques when you require them.

Have a hierarchy of what you’re using to navigate by in the mountains, for example: contours, water features, man made features. Do not include crags / rocks in this hierarchy if you’re using an OS map!

HAZARDS OF STEEP GROUND

IDENTIFY THE HAZARD

complete a dynamic risk assessment - whats the risk and consequence?

either 

  • Verbally mention it / coach them through it

  • Physically position yourself in a place to protect the group

  • Offer psychical assistance (non-rope)

  • and then

  • Collect your group in a safe place

 

USING THE ROPE

When choosing an anchor consider the 3 S's

SIZE - Big is best 

SOLID - It doesn't move / vibrate (visually check it, tap it and then kick it)

SHAPE - The rope doesn't "ride up it

 

If required select an appropriate rope system

DIRECT

(walkers weight goes directly to the anchor)

anchor must be big, bombproof and the rope moves around it easily. This is quick and efficient

INDIRECT

(walkers weight goes through you prior to the anchor)

 

WITH CONFIDENCE ROPING

  • always be above them

  • keep the rope tight

  • feet across the slope is more effective than toes pointing down hill

  • prepare to stop a slip with every step

“The anticipation of my ML assessment was worse

than an OFSTED inspection”

MYTHS, RUMOURS AND REALITY

Paul tells you some of his thoughts on assessment

CORE KIT FOR YOUR LEADER PACK

MOBILE PHONE

GROUP SHELTER

GPS

HEAD TORCH

FIRST AID KIT

ADVICE...

from folk who have recently done their ML Assessment 

Mike, Branwen, Liz & Simon successfully passed their Mountain Leader Assessment over the last few years. Here they offer some advice on preparation for your assessment.